Black Pain: It Just Looks Like We’re Not Hurting, Black Women depression, Can I Get A Witnes?, depression in Black community, Dr. Angela Neal-Barnett, Editor's Picks, julia boyd, List, Meri Nana-Ama Danquah, monica a. coleman, Not Alone: Reflections on Faith and Depression, Panic and Fears, Soothe Your Nerves: The Black Woman’s Guide to Understanding and Overcoming Anxiety, terrie m. williams, Willow Weep for Me: A Black Woman’s Journey Through Depression -

7 Books That Help Black Women Deal With Depression

Black Pain: It Just Looks Like We’re Not Hurting, Black Women depression, Can I Get A Witnes?, depression in Black community, Dr. Angela Neal-Barnett, Editor's Picks, julia boyd, List, Meri Nana-Ama Danquah, monica a. coleman, Not Alone: Reflections on Faith and Depression, Panic and Fears, Soothe Your Nerves: The Black Woman’s Guide to Understanding and Overcoming Anxiety, terrie m. williams, Willow Weep for Me: A Black Woman’s Journey Through Depression -

7 Books That Help Black Women Deal With Depression

7 Books That Can Help Black Women Deal With Depression

blackpainpic4Black Pain: It Just Looks Like We’re Not Hurting’

Terrie M. Williams, one of the nation’s leading public relations experts, has written the definitive book on depression in the Black community. As she managed A-list clients like Eddie Murphy and Miles Davis, Williams dealt with dysthymia, a mild but long-term form of depression. Her book is essential to dealing with the truth about the issue that a large percentage of African-Americans face daily. It is a guide to finding relief through faith, therapy, diet and exercise, as well as through building a supportive network and eliminating toxic people. “Black Pain” identifies emotional pain — which uniquely and profoundly affects the Black experience — as the root of lashing out through desperate acts of crime, violence, drug and alcohol abuse, eating disorders, workaholism, and addiction to shopping, gambling and sex. Few realize these destructive acts are symptoms of inner sorrow.

 

jnma00299-0130-a‘Soothe Your Nerves: The Black Woman’s Guide to Understanding and Overcoming Anxiety, Panic and Fears’

Dr. Angela Neal-Barnett uses her book to cover multiple concerns: the “strong black women syndrome” and anxiety disorder — those who are always on edge or suffering from bad nerves. This insightful read explains the factors that can contribute to depression and goes deeply into a range of healing methods that can help someone struggling to regain balance. Her book is a blueprint for understanding and overcoming anxiety from a psychological, spiritual and Black perspective.


Leave a comment

Related Posts

Kotaku The Singular Life Of Twitch’s Most Foul-Mouthed Streamer | Jalopnik Nissan GT-R Driver Killed
Kotaku The Singular Life Of Twitch’s Most Foul-Mouthed Streamer | Jalopnik Nissan GT-R Driver Killed After Concrete C...
Read More
Over 80 Percent Of The Transgender People Killed In 2018 Were Women Of Color
On November 20, we observe #TransRemembranceDay. According to the Human Rights Campaign (HRC), the Transgender Day of...
Read More
Blac Chyna Is Selling A Skin Lightening Cream, And Folks Aren't Here For It
Blac Chyna has created a new line of skin lightening creams in partnership with Nigerian cosmetics brand Whitenicious...
Read More
On #TransDayofRemembrance (and Every Day), We Implore You to Respect and Protect Trans Lives
By all outward appearances, 2018 was a year of incredible progress for trans people. Of the triumphs: Christine Hallq...
Read More

Tags