Skip to content
Unlimited Books and Movies with Subscription!
Subscribe today to remove prices of All Audiobooks, E-books, Movies and more.
Unlimited Books and Movies with Subscription!
Subscribe today to remove prices of All Audiobooks, E-books, Movies and more.

Ice Cube’s Hollywood takeover continues The rapper-turned-actor’s production company gets major investment from Hong Kong-based company

“Yeah, I’ll check out a movie, but it’ll take a black one to move me.”

That’s what Public Enemy’s Chuck D said on the 1990 single Burn Hollywood Burn, an uptempo track that highlighted the history of negative portrayals of black characters in film and television. Nearly 30 years later, the man who penned the second verse on that track, Ice Cube, is still fighting that cause.

This week, Cube Vision signed a film deal with AID Partners, reportedly in the eight-figure territory, which basically allows the company to develop projects as it sees fit, with its own people, and not be subjected to the foolishness that is the studio development process. And last month, Cube Vision signed a two-year deal with 20th Century Fox to create television projects for both on-air and streaming platforms.

“It’s hard to think of a more multidimensional artist than Ice Cube, whose influence on the culture and enormous talent is virtually unrivaled. He’s a performer, a songwriter, a recording artist, an actor and a filmmaker, and his work speaks to a broad, multigenerational audience,” Fox Television Group chairmen and CEOs Dana Walden and Gary Newman told Deadline at the time.

Don’t look now, but Cube’s made almost 20 movies. You can say what you want about the quality of said films, but there’s no denying at this point that his moves away from the music game are now far enough away from just being a foray designed to cash in on his popularity as a rapper. Cube is a filmmaker and one who’s been as productive as almost any other in the black community in the past 15 years. He’s not just beating people up on camera, he’s creating opportunities for people of color in the film world to create.

Then again, we knew he was one of the smartest people in Los Angeles when he walked away from N.W.A. in the first place.

Previous article Capitalism and Slavery by Eric...

Leave a comment

* Required fields